Etsy Shop Update: Seasons DK

Today’s Teton Knitting Company Etsy Shop update features our Seasons DK, a beautiful, bouncy, squishy yarn in beautiful tonal colorways.

Season DK is a 4-ply superwash merino in 231 yard skeins, just the perfect amount for hats, gloves, scarves in a single skein. Seasons DK is also perfect for sweaters, wraps and blankets. Typically dye batches are 3 skeins but I have the ability to go up to 6 skeins in a batch if you need more for a larger project. Just contact me via the contact button in the upper right hand corner of the Etsy Shop to let me know if you need larger amounts.

Australian Red Cross update: A flock of Heatwave Sock purchases have happened this weekend. I’ll send a new donation over to the Red Cross this coming Friday. Thank you so much for your support. We are doing awesome. My next sock pattern is on the needles.

Heatwave Socks Update

So this morning, I was able to send the first donation to the Australian Red Cross because of your help. I’m rounding up to the nearest $5 plus covering the transaction fees so your support goes as far as possible. Thank you so much for making this possible and helping Australia during this tragedy.

Let’s keep this going as long as possible! I’ll keep you updated with the total amount we have donated so far and keep designing and knitting new patterns to put up in my Ravelry shop. I have lots of ideas for new sock, fingerless gloves and hat patterns running around in my head! The hardest part is deciding which one comes off the needles next!

Find the Heatwave Socks in my Ravelry Store and keep your eyes peeled for new patterns. Every stitch counts!

Knitting Pattern: Heatwave Socks for Australia Red Cross

Fellow knitters, as many of you are aware, Australia is suffering from cataphoric bushfires that have burned 23,000 square miles to date, forcing tens of thousands of people to flee their homes and millions of animals have perished in the fires. The fires have spread so quickly that people have had to flee to the beach for the Australian Navy to rescue them.

The fires have become a global disaster. Smoke from the fires has spread over 9,000 miles to South America. Temperatures have hit record highs in Sydney and Perth. There is little relief for Australia in sight. Australia is in the middle of a devastating, multi-year drought with little rain in forecast and two more months of fire season to go.

Australia needs our help. National resources are strained to capacity. The Australian Prime Minister has called up the national army to help fight the fire and help people evacuate, other countries are sending firefighters and supplies to help fight them.

To help the Australian Red Cross provide assistance to the people evacuated, I have designed the Heatwave Socks, available in my Ravelry Store. All proceeds from the sale of this pattern will go to the Australian Red Cross.

Heatwave Socks in Mountain Sock Shown in Sunflower.

Thank you so much for helping out in any way. Together we can make a difference for Australia one stitch at a time.

Knitting Pattern: Drifting Snow Cowl

This one has been in the works for a while. While suffering a night of insomnia, I found myself on Ravelry going through page after page of cowl patterns. Some cabled, some colorwork, some with lacework, all beautiful and just the perfect quick knit to fight off the winter chill. My fingers were itching for needles and yarn as I scrolled through the pages. With the first snow flakes of winter, I had been considering casting on a scarf of my own. But scarves and I have a love-hate relationship on a good day. A scarf is either too long or too short, leaving a gap. The ends get tangled in my hair, my jacket, my shoulder bag. I have never quite figured out what to do with the ends; try to artfully tie them around my neck, tuck them into my coat, or what?

But cowls are perfect. Cowls are winter cold worst enemy; they perfectly cover up that expose bit of neck and ears from your winter jacket without getting tangled in the long ends of a scarf that you never know how to tuck in. You can wear them slouchy around your neck, pull them up to your nose or cover your head like a hood. The possibilities are endless!

After looking at all the cowl patterns, I was ready to dive into the Teton Knitting Stash with needles in hand to cast one on immediately. But of course, as lovely as everyone else’s cowl patterns are, I had to knit up my own pattern. So out of the stash a lovely skein of Mountain Sock in Oxbow Bend in one hand with my trusty Japanese stitch dictionaries in the other. I immediately had a stitch pattern that blended cables over a background of textured knits and purls in mind as this particularly stitch pattern had thwarted my attempts to use it in a sock pattern for Mountain Man. Alas, Japanese knitting stitches rarely have names, just a number assigned to them.

Drifting Snow Cowl in Mountain Sock in Oxbow Bend.

With a simple but elegant border of moss stitch, the stitch pattern of overlapping cables with the textured knits and purls works seamlessly together. Knit on a US Size 5 (3.75mm) circular needle, this knits up quickly and the pattern works well for either men or women. This one is long enough to scrunch around your neck or pull up to cover your head.

The Drifting Snow Cowl knits up fantastic in solids, tonals or a kettled-dyed multi such as Oxbow Blend. This probably is not the pattern to pull out a bright, multi-colored handpainted skein.

So keep yourself or someone you love (but hey, the holidays are over, time for selfish knitting for yourself after taking care of everyone for the holidays. We won’t tell on you.) the Drifting Snow Cowl to ward off the winter chill.

Second Time Around

The first Albright Peak Scarf for Mountain Man got caught up in accident of tragic circumstances that involved a friend’s dog with a love of hand knit yarn. It’s still painful to talk about.

But Mountain Man loved that scarf enough that he requested another one of the same pattern. This time, I dove into the Teton Knitting Company stash of quirky skeins. The quirky skeins are the skeins that come out of the dye pot with white spots, color a little off, a little tangled or some other quirk where I don’t feel comfortable selling to people without them seeing the quirkiness first. These skeins are perfect for pattern development and/or knitting for friends and family.

To reknit the Albright Scarf, a skein of Mountain Sock in Moulton Barn jumped out as being perfect for Mountain Man. He loves earth tone colors and Moulton Barn with browns, russets, oranges and chestnuts fits his color style perfectly.

For the second knit of the Albright Peak Scarf, I dug out the pattern to knit the pattern as written rather the memory. Second time around, I learned a lot from knitting from the pattern several months after I posted it. Enough to the point, I rewrote the pattern and am issuing Rev. 1 for knitters. Mountain Man assisted with better photos. I think you’ll find it easier to knit this fun, fantastic pattern.

The Albright Scarf knitted in Teton Knitting Company Mountain Sock in Moulton Barn.

I loved how Moulton Barn knitted up. Since it is kettled dyed instead of hand painted, the colors don’t pool into splotches of color that distort the pattern. The colors had enough variety to not be boring but worked as an harmonious whole that allowed the pattern to shine.

Mountain Man is thrilled with the new Albright Peak Scarf to the point he’ll admit he’s glad of the yarn accident. I’m not willing to go that far. Knitting should not be a dog toy!

New Knitting Pattern: Ripple Effect Socks

The Ripple Effect Socks knitted in Teton Knitting Company Mountain Sock in Summer Sky.

Where has summer gone? It seemed like yesterday I was staring longingly up at the Tetons wondering if the snow was ever going to melt enough to get back into the mountains. Now, it’s been non-stop trail runs, afternoon floats, camping trips to make the most of every minute of summer before winter returns to our mountain valley. And when I have been in the mountains, I’ve been in the dye studio, playing with new yarns, new colorways. All of which are listed in the Teton Knitting Company Etsy Shop.

The downside to all this cramming every single second of adventure possible and playing in the dye studio, is not as much time knitting as I would love. As good as I am about knitting in public, I haven’t figured out how to knit while trail running or walking the dogs. And not from lack of trying either.

But enough of the excuses. I finally have a new sock pattern to share with you, Ripple Effect Socks. These were just plain fun to knit. Dead simple but interesting enough to not be boring and will blow your mind with the effect of the stitches. It was my chance to knit with my new Mountain Sock yarn. Which was an absolute joy to knit with; the yarn has beautiful stitch definition, the right amount of twist to hold up for socks without being difficult to knit with.

The Ripple Effect Socks will play with your mind. You’ll be convinced that tiny cables are wrapping around the sock and would take forever to knit. But in reality it is the clever use of purl and knit ribbing that is continually shifting to create the effect.

The beauty of these socks is they are dead simple and great for the beginner that wants to knit it up a notch without dealing with a complicated pattern or fun enough for the experienced knitter that wants a big bang for their knitting buck.

This pattern is incredibly stretching and will accommodated a wide range of calf and foot sizes. And you don’t have to do the normal boring 1″+ of cuff before you start the pattern. You can start the pattern fun right away.

Download this fun new sock pattern on the Knitting Pattern page and swing on over to the Etsy Store to see my latest colors of Mountain Sock to cast on these socks soon. Winter is coming and you’re going to need new socks soon!