Knitting Pattern: Drifting Snow Cowl

This one has been in the works for a while. While suffering a night of insomnia, I found myself on Ravelry going through page after page of cowl patterns. Some cabled, some colorwork, some with lacework, all beautiful and just the perfect quick knit to fight off the winter chill. My fingers were itching for needles and yarn as I scrolled through the pages. With the first snow flakes of winter, I had been considering casting on a scarf of my own. But scarves and I have a love-hate relationship on a good day. A scarf is either too long or too short, leaving a gap. The ends get tangled in my hair, my jacket, my shoulder bag. I have never quite figured out what to do with the ends; try to artfully tie them around my neck, tuck them into my coat, or what?

But cowls are perfect. Cowls are winter cold worst enemy; they perfectly cover up that expose bit of neck and ears from your winter jacket without getting tangled in the long ends of a scarf that you never know how to tuck in. You can wear them slouchy around your neck, pull them up to your nose or cover your head like a hood. The possibilities are endless!

After looking at all the cowl patterns, I was ready to dive into the Teton Knitting Stash with needles in hand to cast one on immediately. But of course, as lovely as everyone else’s cowl patterns are, I had to knit up my own pattern. So out of the stash a lovely skein of Mountain Sock in Oxbow Bend in one hand with my trusty Japanese stitch dictionaries in the other. I immediately had a stitch pattern that blended cables over a background of textured knits and purls in mind as this particularly stitch pattern had thwarted my attempts to use it in a sock pattern for Mountain Man. Alas, Japanese knitting stitches rarely have names, just a number assigned to them.

Drifting Snow Cowl in Mountain Sock in Oxbow Bend.

With a simple but elegant border of moss stitch, the stitch pattern of overlapping cables with the textured knits and purls works seamlessly together. Knit on a US Size 5 (3.75mm) circular needle, this knits up quickly and the pattern works well for either men or women. This one is long enough to scrunch around your neck or pull up to cover your head.

The Drifting Snow Cowl knits up fantastic in solids, tonals or a kettled-dyed multi such as Oxbow Blend. This probably is not the pattern to pull out a bright, multi-colored handpainted skein.

So keep yourself or someone you love (but hey, the holidays are over, time for selfish knitting for yourself after taking care of everyone for the holidays. We won’t tell on you.) the Drifting Snow Cowl to ward off the winter chill.

End of the Year Sale

2019 has been quite the year at Chateau Teton. From building the yarn barn, from mixing all the dyes and the first yarns coming out dye pots. It’s been magically crazy as I play with new yarns and color combinations to develop my style of dyeing.

Thank you all for your support and encouragement. When you start something new, you feel like you are walking a tightrope across a canyon, wondering if this project is going to work, are you headed the right direction, will people enjoy your work, and on and on.

In celebration of your support and to finish the year with a bang, there is a 20% off sale in the Teton Knitting Company Etsy Shop on all regularly priced yarn and knitting pattern books now through January 4, 2020. No minimum purchase necessary.

There are new plans for 2020 that are still in the works. One of the great joys of dyeing is getting to meet you, the fiber artist, to talk with you, see what you are creating and hearing what you enjoy working with and looking for in your fiber journey. I am exploring which fiber fairs and knitting events that are feasible for me to attend within the Pacific Northwest in 2020. Keep checking back as I announce show dates.

The ideas for knitting projects have not stop coming. I have a few more projects that just came off the needles that I need to write up the pattern, find test knitters and get pictures taken. Don’t worry, they will make it up to the website very soon. More ideas are coming to me nearly daily. There isn’t enough time to knit and dye everything that comes to my head!

So keep your eyes peeled for more knitting patterns, show updates and shop updates in 2020! I am looking forward to seeing and hearing from you in 2020!

Thank you for support Teton Knitting Company!

Second Time Around

The first Albright Peak Scarf for Mountain Man got caught up in accident of tragic circumstances that involved a friend’s dog with a love of hand knit yarn. It’s still painful to talk about.

But Mountain Man loved that scarf enough that he requested another one of the same pattern. This time, I dove into the Teton Knitting Company stash of quirky skeins. The quirky skeins are the skeins that come out of the dye pot with white spots, color a little off, a little tangled or some other quirk where I don’t feel comfortable selling to people without them seeing the quirkiness first. These skeins are perfect for pattern development and/or knitting for friends and family.

To reknit the Albright Scarf, a skein of Mountain Sock in Moulton Barn jumped out as being perfect for Mountain Man. He loves earth tone colors and Moulton Barn with browns, russets, oranges and chestnuts fits his color style perfectly.

For the second knit of the Albright Peak Scarf, I dug out the pattern to knit the pattern as written rather the memory. Second time around, I learned a lot from knitting from the pattern several months after I posted it. Enough to the point, I rewrote the pattern and am issuing Rev. 1 for knitters. Mountain Man assisted with better photos. I think you’ll find it easier to knit this fun, fantastic pattern.

The Albright Scarf knitted in Teton Knitting Company Mountain Sock in Moulton Barn.

I loved how Moulton Barn knitted up. Since it is kettled dyed instead of hand painted, the colors don’t pool into splotches of color that distort the pattern. The colors had enough variety to not be boring but worked as an harmonious whole that allowed the pattern to shine.

Mountain Man is thrilled with the new Albright Peak Scarf to the point he’ll admit he’s glad of the yarn accident. I’m not willing to go that far. Knitting should not be a dog toy!

New Knitting Pattern: Ripple Effect Socks

The Ripple Effect Socks knitted in Teton Knitting Company Mountain Sock in Summer Sky.

Where has summer gone? It seemed like yesterday I was staring longingly up at the Tetons wondering if the snow was ever going to melt enough to get back into the mountains. Now, it’s been non-stop trail runs, afternoon floats, camping trips to make the most of every minute of summer before winter returns to our mountain valley. And when I have been in the mountains, I’ve been in the dye studio, playing with new yarns, new colorways. All of which are listed in the Teton Knitting Company Etsy Shop.

The downside to all this cramming every single second of adventure possible and playing in the dye studio, is not as much time knitting as I would love. As good as I am about knitting in public, I haven’t figured out how to knit while trail running or walking the dogs. And not from lack of trying either.

But enough of the excuses. I finally have a new sock pattern to share with you, Ripple Effect Socks. These were just plain fun to knit. Dead simple but interesting enough to not be boring and will blow your mind with the effect of the stitches. It was my chance to knit with my new Mountain Sock yarn. Which was an absolute joy to knit with; the yarn has beautiful stitch definition, the right amount of twist to hold up for socks without being difficult to knit with.

The Ripple Effect Socks will play with your mind. You’ll be convinced that tiny cables are wrapping around the sock and would take forever to knit. But in reality it is the clever use of purl and knit ribbing that is continually shifting to create the effect.

The beauty of these socks is they are dead simple and great for the beginner that wants to knit it up a notch without dealing with a complicated pattern or fun enough for the experienced knitter that wants a big bang for their knitting buck.

This pattern is incredibly stretching and will accommodated a wide range of calf and foot sizes. And you don’t have to do the normal boring 1″+ of cuff before you start the pattern. You can start the pattern fun right away.

Download this fun new sock pattern on the Knitting Pattern page and swing on over to the Etsy Store to see my latest colors of Mountain Sock to cast on these socks soon. Winter is coming and you’re going to need new socks soon!

Hand Dyed Yarns from Teton Knitting Company

After much ado, work to set up the dye studio and creating colorways, I am thrilled to announce my new hand dyed yarns! Thirteen new colorways are up in my brand new Etsy Shop. My first series of colorways, Teton Landmarks is inspired by locations and landmarks across the Tetons.

Mountain Sock in Moulton Barn, inspired by the Moulton Barn on Mormon Row in Grand Teton National Park.

Each quarter of the year, I will introduce another colorway series. The current set of Teton Landmark series will be available in the Etsy Store until September 30, 2019. After that, they will be off on vacation and the next series will take their place.

My first yarn base is Mountain Sock, a durable but soft 4-ply 100% Superwash Merino that has a tight twist that makes it long-lasting without depending on nylon to give it strength. Mountain Socks comes in 3.5 ounce (100 gram) skeins of 438 yards. Enough yardage to make even a pair of socks for Mountain Man. And you know how important generous yardage is to me!

Mountain Sock in Climbing Ranch in Grand Teton National Park.

Over the next week, I’ll introduce each colorway in full to you so can have a peak into what inspires me as a hand dyer and gain a greater love for the Tetons.

Knitting Pattern: The Cascade Stole

With the promise of summer right around the corner, my thoughts turn from knitted socks to lovely, elegant lace to dress up a sundress, drape around my shoulders while watching a Teton sunset or dress an outfit up for a mountain wedding or a night on the town.

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Of the six main canyons that cut through Grand Teton National Park, Cascade Canyon is one of the most popular hiking destinations for visitors every year. Surrounded by towering peaks with waterfalls tumbling down granite walls in the lower section, and graced with wildflowers, open meadows and glaciers in its upper sections of North and South branches, Cascade Canyon is one of the highlights of Grand Teton National Park.
The Cascade Stole combines vine lace, that resembles the tumbling waterfalls, with an elegant laces border that brings to mind the granite peaks that frame Cascade Canyon.

Knit out of one of my favorite lace yarns: buttery soft Handmaiden Sea Silk comes in a variety of hand dyed color ways from subtle tonals to variegated multi-colors with a lovely sheen and drape the plays perfectly to this pattern by echoing the reflection of light on cascading .  The Cascade Stole is simple pattern with an easily memorized four row pattern that only has patterning on the right side rows but still creates an elegant lace effect. The stole can be made wider or narrower by increasing or decreasing the number of repeats of Vine Lace.

Find the Cascade Stole pattern on the Knitting Pattern page for the perfect summery stole.

 

A Sneak Peak of My Next Pattern

Thank you everyone for all the support and love for The Jaw Socks!  The Jaw Socks have made it onto the Ravelry Hot Pattern list.  The words of support mean the world to me and encourage me to design more.

I’ve been designing off and on for years, but only recently have found my design groove. You can find some of my old designs on Ravelry if you look under my name.  The designs are solid, but my pattern writing skills were severely lacking at the time.  I have plans as time permits, to reknit those old designs into yarns that are a better choice for the patterns, retake pictures and rewrite the patterns to be an easier to read format.  So keep your eyes peeled for those relaunching over the reminder of the year.

sHSA+LFKSmKZpaurNGM+tgIn addition to redoing old patterns, I will be releasing new patterns.  In fact, my next design just came off the blocking wires last night and goes out for photos today if the clouds clear enough for descent light.  In this design, I play with a classic but goldie, a heavy lace/fingering yarn, Handmaiden Fine Yarns Sea Silk, just to whet your knitting appetite.

Sea Silk is my crack silk haze (if you get my Rowan reference there).  I have been buying and stashing this amazing yarn from Handmaiden for well over a decade.  My stash even includes a few skeins of when Handmaiden did runs of 150 grams, 600 meter skeins.  Those skeins are some of the holy grails of my knitting stash.  I’m constantly on the lookout for when Handmaiden does a run of them, which I’ve not seen for a while.

Everyone cross their knitting needles for the clouds to lift and clear as the sun rises over the Tetons this morning so I can get photos of this lovely design.  Thank you again for all the knitterly love, support and words of encouragement.