Etsy Shop Update: Seasons DK

Today’s Teton Knitting Company Etsy Shop update features our Seasons DK, a beautiful, bouncy, squishy yarn in beautiful tonal colorways.

Season DK is a 4-ply superwash merino in 231 yard skeins, just the perfect amount for hats, gloves, scarves in a single skein. Seasons DK is also perfect for sweaters, wraps and blankets. Typically dye batches are 3 skeins but I have the ability to go up to 6 skeins in a batch if you need more for a larger project. Just contact me via the contact button in the upper right hand corner of the Etsy Shop to let me know if you need larger amounts.

Australian Red Cross update: A flock of Heatwave Sock purchases have happened this weekend. I’ll send a new donation over to the Red Cross this coming Friday. Thank you so much for your support. We are doing awesome. My next sock pattern is on the needles.

Knitting Pattern: Drifting Snow Cowl

This one has been in the works for a while. While suffering a night of insomnia, I found myself on Ravelry going through page after page of cowl patterns. Some cabled, some colorwork, some with lacework, all beautiful and just the perfect quick knit to fight off the winter chill. My fingers were itching for needles and yarn as I scrolled through the pages. With the first snow flakes of winter, I had been considering casting on a scarf of my own. But scarves and I have a love-hate relationship on a good day. A scarf is either too long or too short, leaving a gap. The ends get tangled in my hair, my jacket, my shoulder bag. I have never quite figured out what to do with the ends; try to artfully tie them around my neck, tuck them into my coat, or what?

But cowls are perfect. Cowls are winter cold worst enemy; they perfectly cover up that expose bit of neck and ears from your winter jacket without getting tangled in the long ends of a scarf that you never know how to tuck in. You can wear them slouchy around your neck, pull them up to your nose or cover your head like a hood. The possibilities are endless!

After looking at all the cowl patterns, I was ready to dive into the Teton Knitting Stash with needles in hand to cast one on immediately. But of course, as lovely as everyone else’s cowl patterns are, I had to knit up my own pattern. So out of the stash a lovely skein of Mountain Sock in Oxbow Bend in one hand with my trusty Japanese stitch dictionaries in the other. I immediately had a stitch pattern that blended cables over a background of textured knits and purls in mind as this particularly stitch pattern had thwarted my attempts to use it in a sock pattern for Mountain Man. Alas, Japanese knitting stitches rarely have names, just a number assigned to them.

Drifting Snow Cowl in Mountain Sock in Oxbow Bend.

With a simple but elegant border of moss stitch, the stitch pattern of overlapping cables with the textured knits and purls works seamlessly together. Knit on a US Size 5 (3.75mm) circular needle, this knits up quickly and the pattern works well for either men or women. This one is long enough to scrunch around your neck or pull up to cover your head.

The Drifting Snow Cowl knits up fantastic in solids, tonals or a kettled-dyed multi such as Oxbow Blend. This probably is not the pattern to pull out a bright, multi-colored handpainted skein.

So keep yourself or someone you love (but hey, the holidays are over, time for selfish knitting for yourself after taking care of everyone for the holidays. We won’t tell on you.) the Drifting Snow Cowl to ward off the winter chill.

End of the Year Sale

2019 has been quite the year at Chateau Teton. From building the yarn barn, from mixing all the dyes and the first yarns coming out dye pots. It’s been magically crazy as I play with new yarns and color combinations to develop my style of dyeing.

Thank you all for your support and encouragement. When you start something new, you feel like you are walking a tightrope across a canyon, wondering if this project is going to work, are you headed the right direction, will people enjoy your work, and on and on.

In celebration of your support and to finish the year with a bang, there is a 20% off sale in the Teton Knitting Company Etsy Shop on all regularly priced yarn and knitting pattern books now through January 4, 2020. No minimum purchase necessary.

There are new plans for 2020 that are still in the works. One of the great joys of dyeing is getting to meet you, the fiber artist, to talk with you, see what you are creating and hearing what you enjoy working with and looking for in your fiber journey. I am exploring which fiber fairs and knitting events that are feasible for me to attend within the Pacific Northwest in 2020. Keep checking back as I announce show dates.

The ideas for knitting projects have not stop coming. I have a few more projects that just came off the needles that I need to write up the pattern, find test knitters and get pictures taken. Don’t worry, they will make it up to the website very soon. More ideas are coming to me nearly daily. There isn’t enough time to knit and dye everything that comes to my head!

So keep your eyes peeled for more knitting patterns, show updates and shop updates in 2020! I am looking forward to seeing and hearing from you in 2020!

Thank you for support Teton Knitting Company!

A Sneak Peak of My Next Pattern

Thank you everyone for all the support and love for The Jaw Socks!  The Jaw Socks have made it onto the Ravelry Hot Pattern list.  The words of support mean the world to me and encourage me to design more.

I’ve been designing off and on for years, but only recently have found my design groove. You can find some of my old designs on Ravelry if you look under my name.  The designs are solid, but my pattern writing skills were severely lacking at the time.  I have plans as time permits, to reknit those old designs into yarns that are a better choice for the patterns, retake pictures and rewrite the patterns to be an easier to read format.  So keep your eyes peeled for those relaunching over the reminder of the year.

sHSA+LFKSmKZpaurNGM+tgIn addition to redoing old patterns, I will be releasing new patterns.  In fact, my next design just came off the blocking wires last night and goes out for photos today if the clouds clear enough for descent light.  In this design, I play with a classic but goldie, a heavy lace/fingering yarn, Handmaiden Fine Yarns Sea Silk, just to whet your knitting appetite.

Sea Silk is my crack silk haze (if you get my Rowan reference there).  I have been buying and stashing this amazing yarn from Handmaiden for well over a decade.  My stash even includes a few skeins of when Handmaiden did runs of 150 grams, 600 meter skeins.  Those skeins are some of the holy grails of my knitting stash.  I’m constantly on the lookout for when Handmaiden does a run of them, which I’ve not seen for a while.

Everyone cross their knitting needles for the clouds to lift and clear as the sun rises over the Tetons this morning so I can get photos of this lovely design.  Thank you again for all the knitterly love, support and words of encouragement.

 

Knitting Patterns: The Jaw Socks

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Just in time for the budding of the Aspens here in Teton Valley, I bring you The Jaw Socks.  Now, you must be thinking that the inspiration for these socks is Jaws the movie.  You can even hear the Jaws theme song playing in the background as you read this.  But you would be a bit off the mark.

The Jaw is also a ridge line of impressive, craggy, jagged granite spires, rising above Holly Lake, that separates Paintbrush Canyon from Cascade Canyon in Grand Teton National Park.  The adventurous will run The Jaw from Mount St. John to the Paintbrush Divide.  Yes, you read right, run it.  No, I’m not that adventurous.  Ridge running is not quite my cup of tea but I’ve known that have done it.

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Knit out of one of my favorite sock yarns, Hedgehog Fibres Sock in the color way Swamp. (They call it Swamp, I prefer to think of it as Aspen Green, but to each their own.)  The Jaw Socks are a fantastic basic sock for the beginning sock knitter that is ready to step up from the knit 2, purl 2 sock to a bit more. With just enough pattern to keep it boring, but simple enough to follow along without getting lost. The pattern is easily adjustable to a variety of sizes and fits, being very stretchy and forgiving.  This pattern also works for men, women and children.

So cue up the Jaws theme song, find the pattern on The Knitting Patterns Page and cast on these socks no matter what inspires you.

Knitting Patterns: Symmetry Spires Socks

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As they say, “A day late and a dollar short.” My apologies for the delay in getting the new sock pattern: Symmetry Spires Socks uploaded to the webpage.  It took me a bit to sweet talk Mountain Man to pose for pictures.

Without further ado, I introduce to you the Symmetry Spire Socks.  Inspired by Symmetry Spire above Jenny Lake in Grand Teton National Park. Symmetry Spire rises over Jenny Lake as a lovely granite spire that forms north side of the entrance to Cascade Canyon. While appearing insignificant compared to the larger peaks of the Cathedral Group, Symmetry Spire has played a key role in the history of mountaineering in Grand Teton National Park with many famous Teton climbers using Symmetry Spire as training climbs for numerous first ascents in the park.

This unisex sock pattern features an easily memorized 3 row chart pattern that flows of the needles that is available in three sizes to fit a wide range of feet sizes.  The suggested yarn is Mountain Colors Crazy Foot in colorway Copper Mountain; Crazy Foot is a versatile but durable yarn of 90% superwash merino, 10% nylon with great yardage.  But  the pattern will easily accommodate a wide range of sock yarns from your stash.

Find the Symmetry Spires Socks on our Knitting Patterns page.

From These Humble Beginnings

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It doesn’t look like much.  Really just an old garden shed that seen better days, odds n’ ends left in there when all the tools got transferred to the newer and bigger shop.  It’s home to a few rogue groups of yellow wasps and the occasional cat-faced spider.   Hard to think of being anything more than just a garden shed overlooking the orchard and garden.  It is easy for anyone to overlook to be something more than what it is.

But Mountain Man suggested it when I was musing outloud about where to set up a dye studio.  We live in a pretty small A-frame house where Mountain Man works from home, so an entire room is set up as his office, and a lot part of the downstairs is dedicated to all things outdoors: i.e. the Gear Room.  Setting up long term in the kitchen is a no-go for me for fear of contaminating food and cooking surfaces with dye powder and I’m not exactly the neatest dyer to ever walk this earth.  Not to mention the kitchen is in the midst of a three year remodeling project with no end in sight.

“The garden shed,” I said outloud after Mountain Man suggested it after I was running out of ideas.

“Yes, the garden shed,”  he responded, taking a long pull of his whiskey and coke.

“Let’s go see,” as we strolled out to the garden shed.

Md4FZ5ydSSmpy48S8d1qawPulling open the door to peer into the dimness, I ducked under the abandoned cat-faced spider web to look around.  With solid shelves in the corner, and a table just inside the door, I had worked with far less in my pursuit of dyeing yarn.  “Yes,” I said slowly, turning to look around.  “Yes, it will work.  Actually, it will work quite well.”

“Will it work? I’ll help you build table and shelves in there if you tell me what you want.”

I do not have many gifts or talents really when you look at it.  I’m not a gifted artist, my singing will make you wish you were deaf, my writing so-so, more people are far smarter than me and so forth.  But my one gift or knack, is taking what other people would overlook, discard, or ignore and make it mine.  My first horse was a “nag” that no one bid on at the local community college horse auction.  We went on to win the high point award for our regional horse club three years later.  My first bedroom was a corner in an unfinished basement where I stacked boxes to form walls in order to no longer share a bedroom with my sister.  My parents finally built the bedroom around me after they realized I was not going to move back upstairs to share a bedroom with my sister.  I scored a hardwall office of my very own at work after no one wanted to deal with an old store room chocked full of junk.  From classwork, to jobs no one else wanted at work, I took on what no one else wanted and made something of it because it was all I can get sometimes and that was better than nothing.

And now with this little garden shed, with its quirks, I am going to do it again.  It’s not my ideal, dream studio of easy clean stainless steel counter types, an endless supply of hot water at the touch of spout.  Sure, I’ll be limited to only being able to dye in warm weather and there will be work to do to get it ready for a dye studio.  I’ll have to use water from the hose and clean all the odds n’ ends out.  The wasps nests have already been evicted out the door and will have to be vigilant against them in the future.  I’ll make peace with the cat-faced spider when she returns in the spring as she will guard against insects and is lovely to look at.  I have had far worst roommates during my college days than a cat-faced spider.

It’s a far better dye space I’ve had before, dyeing in dark corners of unfinished basements or in the back of the garage, salvaging whatever equipment/work surfaces I could find from my family’s stockpiles of odds and ends.  The large window folds up, letting in abundance of natural light and plenty of fresh air.  With tables running down both sides, I’ll have far more work surfaces than I have ever had before.  As I work, I’ll be able to look out across our orchard and herb and vegetable garden.  The flowering plum tree and crabapple that my beloved Misty Moo and Captain Maxwell are buried under are right outside the door.

Friday was spent happily cleaning out the shed, music blaring on the bluetooth speaker, as I measured, debated, and planned.  The final layout is still in draft stages but the building supplies are on order and a plan of attack is in place to make this a reality.

To complete a journey of a thousand miles, I have to start somewhere after all.